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Year of Mercy – Our Vocation to be merciful towards Others


by Fr Duncan McVicar on 26/06/2016 -

If we have received God’s mercy, and we believe in God’s mercy, then the desire will be alive in us to make that mercy available to others so that they too can experience it. We do this by becoming a “transparency” of God – in other words, people see the love of God alive in us and working in us. We become like a “window” to God. People look at us, and in fact they don’t see us alone, they also see God in us. This is the aim and ultimate destination of every Christian. This is what the first and greatest commandment actually means – to love God with all our hearts and to love our neighbour as ourselves. The Year of Mercy highlights the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy as the “blueprint” for the life of faith. Pope Francis writes in his Book “The Name of God is Mercy”: Jesus sends forth his disciples not as holders of power or as masters of a law. He sends them forth into the world asking them to live in the logic of love and selflessness. What are the most important things that a believer should do during the Holy Year of Mercy? He should open up to the mercy of God, open up his heart and himself, and allow Jesus to come toward him by approaching the confessional with faith. And he should try and be merciful with others. Let us examine the Seven Corporal Works of Mercy: feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, shelter the traveller, comfort the sick, visit the imprisoned, bury the dead. I do not think there is much to explain. And if we look at our situation, our society, it seems to me that there is no lack of circumstances or opportunities all around us. We touch the flesh of Christ in he who is outcast, hungry, thirsty, naked, imprisoned, ill, unemployed, persecuted, in search of refuge. That is where we find our God, that is where we touch the Lord. Christ himself told us, explaining the protocol for which we will all be judged: “Whatever you did to one of these brothers of mine, even the least of them, you did it to me” (Matthew 25:40).  After the Corporal Works of Mercy come the Spiritual Works of Mercy: advise those in doubt; teach the ignorant; admonish the sinners; console the afflicted; forgive offences; be patient with annoying people; pray to God for both the living and the dead. Let us look at the first four Spiritual Works of Mercy: Don’t they have to do with what we have already defined as “the apostolate of the ear?” Reach out, know how to listen, advise them, and teach them through our own experience. By welcoming a marginalised person whose body is wounded and by welcoming the sinner whose soul is wounded, we put our credibility as Christians on the line. Let us always remember the words of Saint John of the Cross: “In the evening of life, we will be judged on love alone.” It seems today, in the light of so many needs and so much woundedness in modern-day people and in modern-day society, this merciful love of God is so painfully needed and so urgently necessary. The first “profession” and the first vocation of every Christian is love: to do everything because of love, through love and for love. Every Christian should be “a place” where people can discover and encounter God and where God and his merciful love are made present and evident. Love has to permeate everything, and love should be at the heart of every Christian life. We are referring here to a love that is personal, that is warm and from the heart, that is willing to sacrifice and that perseveres for the welfare of others, putting them always first. The greatest power in heaven and on earth is the power of love, and love is also the best and most creative way to educate and form the human heart. In other words, we have to become “geniuses” of love, and we do this by allowing love not to remain some kind of theory, but to be the greatest motivator for what we say and do in our own personal lives.

 




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